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Je m’excuse: Regularly scheduled programming has been interrupted while Michael is the final throes of completing his thesis. He has added me, Teresa Lo, to the roster of writers for this blog in an effort to keep you entertained. Even though I work in the securities industry, I am the furthest thing from a quant; therefore, no highbrow math is forthcoming. Instead, I hope to tickle, sometimes quite inadvertently, the substantial intellects of Mahalanobis readers with crude fodder that only a lowly technical trader of securities can provide. If you are really desperate for a laugh, I can and will provide market opinions (upon request) that are sure to trigger howls of laughter from here to eternity.

And now, here is my first post:
Male chimps prefer older matesImoso, the highest-ranking male in the Kanyawara community of Kibale National Park, Uganda, grooms Outamba, a middle-aged female. Male chimpanzees at Kanyawara consistently prefer the oldest females in their community as mating partners, suggesting that the preference that human men exhibit for youthful women is a recent evolutionary phenomenon. For more information, see the Report by Muller et al. in the November 21 Current Biology. (Credit: Photograph by Jean-Michel Krief)
Washington Post: Chimpanzees may be our closest biological relatives, but male chimps appear to differ from male humans in one striking way -- they clearly prefer older females, according to new research...Regardless of the explanation, the findings clearly show that chimps and humans have evolved differently in this important way, the researchers said.
This story got me thinking: are humans really different from chimpanzees? Or were chimps simply more evolved in this department, with humans finally catching up?

According to recent statistics, almost one-third of women between 40-69 are "cougars" dating men at least ten years younger. From Sex and the City to Demi Moore and Ashton Kutcher, the May-December phenomenon is flourishing everywhere. Perhaps economists can provide a working hypothesis?

For readers in Canada, the December 3 episode of Sex, Toys & Chocolate on LifeNetwork will focus on this topic.

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