about me
art
biz
Chess
corrections
economics
EconoSchool
Finance
friends
fun
game theory
games
geo
mathstat
misc
NatScience
... more
Profil
Logout
Subscribe Weblog

 
WSJ: A major survey of U.S. researchers has found that unethical practices are more common and widespread in science than previously believed.

The study (n = 3000, funded by the National Institutes of Health) found that 33% of scientists admit to engaging in at least one of 10 behaviors considered unethical by university officials, such as "cooking" research data, changing results, or ignoring rules designed to protect human volunteers.

The study asked questions about 33 behaviors ranging from outright fraud to whether a scientist had ever signed a letter without fully reading it. <> According to the survey results, outright fraud is rare. Only 0.3% of scientists polled admitted they had falsified research data in the last three years; 1.4% admitted to plagiarism.

Other problems were far more common. Nearly 8% said they had ignored some rules designed to protect human volunteers, and nearly one in three said they failed to keep adequate records of their research projects. About half the respondents admitted engaging in careless behaviors, such as cutting corners. |Source, $|

Addendum:
see also Rent-Seeking Behavior Is Undermining Research, Mark Thoma (Economist's View)